Los Angeles Man Arrested For Making Swatting Call

December 30, 2017 Update to post Man Killed In Swatting Prank.

Along with the arrest, more information has been released about the false report known as “swatting” that resulted in an un-involved, innocent man being killed by the police.

Tyler R. Barriss, 25-years old, has been arrested on suspicion of making the swatting call that ended with Wichita police killing Andrew Finch.  The person targeted for swatting gave the perpetrator a fake address that turned out to be the home of Andrew’s mother where he was visiting.  Police shot and killed Andrew, who was unarmed.

Andrew Finch is the father of two.

It has now been reported that Barriss told 911 that he was inside the house,  had shot his father in the head, was armed, and holding hostages.  He also told dispatch that he had poured gasoline all over the house and was going to set it on fire.  Therefore, the police engaged the incident thinking that they were confronting an armed man who had just murdered his father.

Barriss was arrested on a felony warrant in South Los Angeles.  He is charged with reporting a fake homicide and hostage situation.   He is being held without bond until a hearing can be scheduled.

Some states have laws that when a crime is being committed and an innocent person is killed, that the perpetrator can be charged with murder.

According to the LA Times, Barris was arrested in 2015 for making false bomb threats to ABC7 in Glendale. The calls forced the studio to evacuate.  On September 30 and again on October 9, 2015, Barriss threatened a relative to prevent her from reporting the incidents.

Krebsonsecurity reports that Barriss has  taken credit for false reports of a bomb threat at the U.S. Federal Communications Commission that disrupted a high-profile public meeting on the net neutrality debate; a false bomb threat that forced the evacuation of the Dallas Convention Center; and a false bomb threat at a high school in Panama City, Florida.

 

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